Book Discussion: Gendered Books

bd; gendered booksOften, books are aimed at one gender or the other. For example, Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins is aimed primarily at girls, whereas Anthony Horowitz’s books are aimed primarily at boys. Now, I’m not saying that each sex can’t read each other’s books, but the question is, should we have gendered books, and even if the content is gendered should aspects like the cover and author’s name be gendered too?

To continue using the example above, Anna is a pink book whereas Horowitz’s are reds, greens and blues most of the time. This automatically genders the book in our society of today: no young boy would ordinarily, or stereotypically, be seeing reading a pink book. However, girls can, it seems, read any colour book and still keep in the stereotypes of society. For example, on my own bookshelves I have every colour of the rainbow (providing you’re going with the ROYGBIV version!). Whereas on my brother’s bookshelf, he probably has just ROGB. So… a much less wide collection.

Famously, Jo Rowling had to use a pseudonym when publishing the Harry Potter series, so she could “appeal to everyone”. Jo’s name is Joanne Rowling: she has no middle name, so the “K” is borrowed from a relative, and stands for Kathleen (or nothing in Jo’s case, I guess). But what does this tell us about how publishers think people’s minds work? They thought “JK Rowling” would sell better than “Jo Rowling” because then it could be debatable about the author’s own gender. Does that mean publishers think boys won’t read books written by authors like Cassandra Clare, Jodi Picoult or Lauren St John if they wrote the kind of stuff a boy would read?

Suzanne Collins is probably one of the biggest anomalies in the situations I’ve set up here: she clearly has a female name and her books come in a variety of colours, but both girls and boys read and enjoy them. Some of the editions of The Hunger Games are published in black, orange and blue (my collection); some are all black (my brother’s collection); and the newest ones out are pink, orange and green. And yet, both genders alike will probably read any of these, which then begs the question: is it the content which dictates what the different genders stereotypically read?

In the three female authors I named a paragraph ago, Cassandra Clare may appeal to both sexes (I’ve never read anything of hers, so I don’t know), Jodi Picoult is aimed at adult women and Lauren St John is aimed at teenagers – a gender is not specified. Clare writes about demons and angels, Picoult writes literary fiction about families and St John writes mainly about animals, such as horses or giraffes (uh, that’s two different series). But it’s interesting to discover that boys will probably read the former and girls the two latter… as well as the former. It seems that today’s society means girls are more likely to read anything open to them, but boys are sectioned off to read action/adventure, westerns or crime. It seems that if a boy settled down with a cosy romance, they’d be looked on as “weird”.

The final question of this post? Should books be gendered at all. Personally, I think that, as a lot of things in society, it can’t be helped. Most boys simply don’t want to read about horse riding or kissing. Some girls only want to read about these, whereas other girls are open to all. In some ways, it appears that girls are the more flexible ones: or perhaps have a wider degree of interest. Other times, it seems like publishers try to warp the book’s author, cover or blurb to appeal to one sex and not the other, securing an interest base.

Now it’s over to you, dear readers. How much do you think books are gendered in today’s society? Do you think they should be? Do you think it can be helped? What type of books do you/your parents/your brother and sister read and do you think they fit into these categories neatly, or can you find anomalies like Suzanne Collins? I’d love to hear from you! 

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Anna and the French Kiss

Anna Oliphant really doesn’t want to spend her final year of high school in Paris’ School of America. But her novelist father insists, and suddenly she finds herself 4383 miles away from her home in Georgia. She has to leave behind her best friend, Bridgette, and her kind-of-boyfriend, Toph, for a totally new place. And then, well, she meets the beautiful, enthusiastic, totally-not-allowed-to-date Étienne St Clair.

I really, really enjoyed Anna and the French Kiss! I read it for a book group on Instagram, and I am so glad I did.

To begin with, I really enjoyed the plot. Whilst not completely unique – it’s about a group of teenage friends at a boarding school – I liked how it was different, with the School of America in Paris (SOAP), how Anna didn’t actually speak the language to begin with. Another thing was the fact the romance – obviously between Anna and Étienne – was built upon from the beginning. It wasn’t just a ‘bang – they’re in love!’ type of thing, but really did have drama and life problems sprung in their paths as well as their relationship actually being developed upon in the entire duration of the book.

The characters were also pretty great – finally, a main character who is 3D, is witty and one I genuinely wanted to be my friend! The supporting characters were all unique and different too, I really enjoyed reading about all of them but for different reasons. Étienne was humouous, Josh was almost a male version of myself, Rashmi was the sarky one I love but am never quite sure how to respond to, and Meredith was simply the unable-to-live-without good friend.

Anna was just great. She’s different, slightly weird, and hilarious. I related to her so much, with the friend troubles and, yes, boyfriend troubles! I just..gah, I loved her.

Étienne, the main male character, was a sweet, funny guy – however, he could also be a bit of a jerk at times, but I guess this brings out the realism of the novel. You’re not going to fall in love with someone who is perfect – everyone has flaws. I think that his were pretty bad, but Anna can overlook them because she fell in love with the person underneath. Also, I would have liked to have seen more of Anna and Bridge’s back story, as well as more of her and Meredith and Rashmi. More Josh would have been nice too, but I think his story is in Isla and the Happy Ever After, the third book in the series.

I also really liked Perkins’ writing style – it had me laughing out loud and was just addicting, much like Jackson Pearce’s. I would – and will – definitely read anything else by her!

I would recommend this to people who enjoy romantic comedies, probably more teenagers but I’m sure older people could enjoy it too, even though it’s clearly aimed at students. It’s good for light-hearted reading too, although tough issues like cancer are addressed. I really enjoyed Anna and the French Kiss and will definitely be reading the sequels – Lola and the Boy Next Door and Isla and the Happy Ever After. Now just to save enough money to buy them…


TITLE: Anna and the French Kiss
AUTHOR: Stephanie Perkins
PUBLISHER: Usborne House
YEAR OF PUBLICATION: 2014
NUMBER OF PAGES: 401
PRICE: £6.99
ISBN: 978-1-4095-7993-3
GOODREADS
PERSONAL SOURCE: Bought from Waterstones in Winchester