Review-Tainted Reading? | Book Talk

book20reviewI’ve been reviewing books I’ve read for a good while now, maybe a year or two. Considering how much I’ve read, I would say that’s nearly 200 reviews. And, since being a reviewer, I think the way I read has changed.

Before, I might read a book and say, “That! That was amazing!” and I’d move on. Now, I feel like during the actual reading process, and especially after, I’m scrutinising every word, every character, and I’m worried that being a reviewer is tainting how I read. (Perhaps ‘tainted’ is a bit strong, but it has changed how I read.)  Continue reading “Review-Tainted Reading? | Book Talk”

Top Ten Books For Readers Who Like Historical Fiction

So I was honestly going to do this on Tuesday, but I was babysitting and my laptop died and then I went out to see The Imitation Game last night (it’s great, watch it) so yeah now I’m finally getting around to it!

  1. The Lady in the Tower – Marie Louise Jensen. One of the first historical fiction books I ever read.
  2. Journey to the River Sea – Eva Ibbotson. In my top 5 all time favourite book list! Maia and Finn are just fantastic.
  3. The Wreck of the Zanzibar – Michael Morpurgo. One of my favourite Morpurgo books (see a trend here?) – it’s even signed! It’s told in a diary.
  4. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society – Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows. Read for my book club, it’s an epistolary novel and details post-WWII London and Guernsey. Fantastic characters and great all round book.
  5. Raven Queen –  Pauline Francis. This one is about Lady Jane Grey, or, as you may know her, the Nine-Day Queen. Her tragic story is made even more so by a character called Ned. I bawled.
  6. True History of the Kelly Gang  – Peter Carey. Whilst my other English Lit and Lang friends may disagree, I think that True History is a great book. Told in the style of Ned Kelly (so, no punctuation really) from his Jerilderie Letter, Carey really brings Ned and his gang alive.
  7. The Book Thief  – Markus Zusak. One of the most famous WWII novels out there after the release of the film (and indeed before), The Book Thief will hopefully make you both smile and cry. Just enjoy it.
  8. Bracelet of Bones – Kevin Crossley-Holland. Whilst not my favourite book, definitely a good one for Norse history and myths.
  9. Atonement – Ian McEwan. Just read the review. That’s all I have to say. (Oh, and then, of course, read the book.)
  10. A Brighter Fear – Kerry Drewery. Only recent history (from 2003 to be exact), A Brighter Fear is still a testimony to the recent events in Iraq and Afghanistan. Definitely not made rosy. it’s an interesting and at times heartbreaking read.

I absolutely adore historical fiction, and so should you! Even contemporary novels, such as The Great Gatsby or Black Beauty are amazingly awesome and definitely worth a read.

Extra book: Between Shades of Grey by Ruta Sepetys. Read it. Cry. Talk to me. Cry again. 😀 

PS: all hyperlinks are to book reviews on my other blog 🙂