Top Ten Authors I’d Love To Have Coffee With | aka I rave about Shakespeare *again*

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly prompt hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl and created by The Broke and the Bookish.

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I am actually terrible at meeting authors. I completely freeze up and forget how my tongue works, I sometimes splutter “I LOVE YOUR BOOK” as I’m running away from the signing desk, and I will happily walk around the rest of the day clutching an important book to my chest.

Despite all of this, and the enormous anxiety that meeting my favourite authors brings me, there are still some fantastic writers I would love to meet (and flail in front of) preferably in front of a rather large latte.

(Also, the “top ten Tuesday” prompt never said they had to be alive. Heh.)

Continue reading “Top Ten Authors I’d Love To Have Coffee With | aka I rave about Shakespeare *again*”

Classics on my TBR

I really would love to read some more classics in the new year. I tried to take part in a couple of classics challenges this year… but it just didn’t really happen.

With that being said, here are some classics on my TBR (to be read). I am doing a module at university next year called Austen and the Brontes, so I have excluded any of their novels that appear on that module list – all bar Pride and Prejudice are on my TBR! – so here are some that I want to read without them being prescribed reading!

Image result for howards end penguin english libraryHowards End by EM Forster

I believe that this has been adapted by the BBC and broadcast in the past couple of weeks, but I would love to read this novel. I read A Room With a View by Forster over summer, and absolutely loved it, so I’m so excited to get to this one!

Image result for dracula penguin english libraryDracula by Bram Stoker 

I’ve wanted to read the original Dracula for a long time, especially as I’ve recently read Hunting Prince Dracula by Kerri Maniscalco (incredible series, btw). My incredible friend Natalie bought this for me recently, and I’m so excited to tuck myself up in bed, make sure there’s no vampires hiding in my room, and read it!

Image result for i capture the castle vintageI Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith 

I actually got this for Christmas… last year… and have not read it yet. This is a children’s classic, but that is not stopping me from wanting to read it! I have a beautiful edition too, with a cute cat on the spine (yes, I’m looking at it right now, and wanting to dive right into it) so I’m excited to read it!

Image result for fahrenheit 451 bookFahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury 

I reaaaaaaally want to read this book (sadly, however, it is at home right now). It’s a relatively short book too, so theoretically I should be able to devour it quickly. It’s one of my friend’s favourite books, and she keeps bugging at me to read it, so I should probably get around to that one sharpish.

Image result for down and out in paris and londonDown and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell 

I’ve read a few pieces by George Orwell – Animal Farm is one of my all-time favourite books – and I would really love to read Down & Out. Others on my Orwell TBR include basically the rest of his books! Homage to Catalonia is also high on my Orwell TBR.

I really hope you guys enjoyed this list! What’s on your classical literature TBR? I would love to know! and if you have any recommendations for me, I would love those also.

Until the next time,

hannah sign off

DNF’ing Books?

Nowadays, I strive to always finish a book, no matter how long it takes. Pride and Prejudice famously took me three months and a few days to read, and there is only one (or maybe two) books on my bookshelf which I haven’t read. However, as I write this, I am struggling through George Orwell’s A Clergyman’s Daughter. Even though I’ve just got to the good bit.

Continue reading “DNF’ing Books?”

To Chapter or Not To Chapter?

to chapter or not to chapterWhen I read Monstrous Regiment by Terry Pratchett for my reading group a few months ago, I noticed something that none of my friends did: Pratchett doesn’t use chapters. Rather, big sections are differed between by a mark on the page, but the next section doesn’t start at the top of the next. You might have seen this in books with chapters: a little asterisk in the middle of the page, indicating moving on… Kind of like this:

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Look familiar?

When writing, you basically have the complete (well, almost, unless your agent/editor decides to change it, but it is your book…) on how to present it on the inside. So, you can have chapters, or you can choose not to. You might have loads of chapters with only a few lines in between, or choose to not have chapters but have section breakers instead. All of these have their own strengths and weaknesses and a lot of it does depend on the book you’re writing.

Most people assume: books = chapters. But that isn’t always the case. So, when writing your next book, why not think of doing something else, something different? If, for example, you’re writing a fantasy or dystopia, you might find it easier to use section headings instead. In 1984, George Orwell did something similar having a “Part I” and “Part II”, with no chapters in those parts, and used asterisks like Pratchett. Tolkien, however, has long chapters, which are clearly defined as such.

The greats broke the rules, and so can you, so, if it works for you and for your book, why not think about something different in your writing?

Top Ten Classics I Can’t Believe I Haven’t Read Yet

So I thought I’d try Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, because I’ve always wanted to and therefore I am!

Classics have always been high on my list to read – and a couple of days ago, I went on a massive ‘buying’ spree on Amazon Kindle Store (they were all free, because they’re in public domain – and, if you don’t have a Kindle, you can always download the app! Free books, guys. Free books.), and downloaded loads onto my Kindle for the summer when I’m away for four weeks and can’t take any books with my *sob*. So I thought I’d make this week’s TTT apt to what I’m wanting to read!

  1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  2. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen – okay, all Jane Austen books (except Pride and Prejudice)
  3. Animal Farm by George Orwell
  4. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury 
  5. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo 
  6. The Lord of the Rings trilogy by JRR Tolkien
  7. The Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  8. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott 
  9. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte 
  10. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte 

And one for luck I just remembered: Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild

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What’s yours?