Unboxing | Books That Matter: “Herland” | July 2021

Books That Matter delivered another stellar box this month, and even though, for the first time, I already had the book, I was still very excited to open it.

“Herland” was themed around feminist utopia and dystopia. In recent months, pop culture has seen the rise of dystopias once again, with the likes of books released in the pandemic as well as hits such as The Handmaid’s Tale. I think it’s a really interesting theme to have a book box themed around, especially a feminist one like BTM.

Continue reading “Unboxing | Books That Matter: “Herland” | July 2021″

UNBOXING | Books That Matter February 2021 | GIRL, GODDESS, OTHER

Today I am going to be sharing my unboxing of Books That Matter’s February 2021 box! The theme of this month was GIRL, GODDESS, OTHER.

Overall, I really enjoyed this box! I thought it was very aesthetically pleasing in lovely lilac colours, and the contents all worked really well together. Sometimes I think you can get book boxes that look like 7 different people each added an item, but not here.

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Book Review | The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed

36039165Lucy Moynihan was run out of town because she accused the popular guys at school of gang rape. Everyone knows that. And no one ever speaks of it. 

The Nowhere Girls are every girl. But they start with just three: Grace, Rosina, and Erin. Together, they form the Nowhere Girls, and decide to avenge the rape of a girl silenced because she spoke the truth. 

I have wanted to read this book for so long and when it was £2 (!) on Amazon, I bought it straight away and devoured it as soon as it arrived.

The topic of this book is something that drew me straight away. I love stories about girls who band together to speak up for injustice (like Moxie by Jennifer Matheiu) and it’s happening more and more in everyday life too (eg #MeToo). I really value authors writing about feminism and standing up for justice, and this was such a brilliant book about it!

The characters are interesting and diverse, of different races and sexuality, and I especially loved how we got to look at all of them. Reed writes in four different points of view – Grace, Rosina, Erin, and Us. “Us” was probably my favourite, and I wish Reed had written more from this because it was just such a stunning portrayal of people. It seemed to jump in and out of different girls’ heads, telling us things that the narrator knows but no one else does, sometimes not even the characters themselves.

The present tense, omnipotent narrator was an interesting choice, but I’m glad that Reed branched out and made it. It was fascinating to read, not least because I’ve rarely read from a perspective like this, but because it allowed us to jump around without it feeling jarring. There were of course certain POVs I liked more than others, but I think that that really shows the scope of a great writer.

Overall, I was completely gripped and I adored this book. It’s one of those books that gave me tingles down my arms when I thought of the characters and the injustices in this world faced by women all over the place. It’s one that I really think doesn’t get talked about enough in the bookosphere, and I would really like it to be far, far more!

Rating: 4.5/5

Goodreads
Source: bought from Amazon

Book Review | Asking For It by Louise O’Neill (12/12 Book Club: January)

9781784293208

TW: Rape.

Slut, liar, skank, bitch, whore. 

In a small town, where everyone knows everyone, Emma O’Donovan is different: she’s pretty, popular, “in”. She works hard to keep it that way. At least, she did – until that night. Now she’s an embarrassment, a slut, nothing to anyone and everyone knows it. And the pictures – the pictures – that everyone has seen means that she can never forget. 

Go into a crowded place, and look around. You’re probably in a group of strangers, not really knowing anyone. Well, that’s where you’re wrong. Look around again. There are Emmas everywhere. There are Emmas who don’t know it yet; Emmas who are still denying it; Emmas who have gone through everything that can be thrown at them and still have nightmares; Emmas who are years and years older but still shy when an unfamiliar hand touches their shoulder; Emmas who are standing behind you, in front of you, next to you, and you might not even know it.  Continue reading “Book Review | Asking For It by Louise O’Neill (12/12 Book Club: January)”