My University TBR

This semester at university, in comparison to last semester, I have a rather large reading list, which I thought would be nice to share with you guys! I am taking three modules: Austen and the Brontës, Shakespeare, and Poetry [creative writing].

Austen and the Brontës

Image result for jane austen

For this module, I am reading 3 books by Jane Austen and one for each of the Brontës.

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
  • Persuasion by Jane Austen
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
  • The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë

Shakespeare

Image result for william shakespeare

I am so excited to be studying Shakespeare, especially as a week before my module began they changed one of the plays we were studying to Macbeth, which is my favourite! I cannot wait to study it again (although it is in the last week, which is a bit annoying).

  • Henry V 
  • Richard II 
  • Romeo and Juliet 
  • A Midsummer’s Night Dream 
  • Twelfth Night 
  • The Winter’s Tale
  • Hamlet
  • Macbeth

I’ve read/studied/been in Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer’s Night Dream, and Macbeth, so I’m glad that there are more that I haven’t studied before.

Poetry

For my poetry book, we’re encouraged to read widely of poetry, so there isn’t really a set reading list. Having said that, we do have one anthology:

  • Emergency Kit edited by Jo Shapcott

I’ve read a couple of poems from here already and really enjoyed them. Although we probably won’t have much set reading throughout this module, I’ll enjoy dipping in and out of the book.

If you’re studying this year, what is on your reading list? Have you read anything from mine?

Until the next time,

hannah sign off

Rules of Speech #2

Hey, folks. So, on November 15th, I did a post on the Rules of Speech (basically, grammar when writing dialogue). But, I realised I missed some stuff out, so here I am for mark 2!

For other info, please read the other article, linked above. I’ll be doing stuff today about separate sentences, and verbs splitting up speech.

Firstly, if you do a line of speech, and then the next line isn’t connected, it finishes in a full stop, and the next sentence starts with a capital letter. Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon, don’t worry.” Alice passed him a rubber duck.

Likewise, it works the other way. Example:

Alice passed him a rubber duck. “You’ll be one of us soon, don’t worry.” 

If the verb/s (eg ‘said’) describes the speech, it has commas. Read the article linked above for this info. 🙂

If a verb splits up a line of speech, but the whole bit of speech is one sentence, it’s all commas and lowercase letters. Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon,” she said, “don’t worry.”

If a verb splits up a line of speech, but they’re two separate sentences, it’s a comma, full stop and capital letter (in that order). Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon,” she said. “Don’t you worry.” 

If a word splits up a line of speech, but isn’t related to the way it’s spoken, it’s all full stops and capital letters. Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon.” She passed him a rubber duck. “Don’t you worry.”

So yeah, that’s basically it! Any other info? Feel free to ask! 🙂

And please, please, please read the other article for extra information about rules of speech. Look, I’ll even link it again!

– Hannah 🙂

Which Witch is Which?

So, ’cause I can’t think of much to write today – and I’m too tired to do much else, plus watching Doctor Who (yay!) – I thought I would go through four very confused different types of words (if that made any sense whatsoever).

First up: which witch is which?

  • Witch – a being that can harness/use magic. Hermione Granger is one of these.
  • Which – ‘which one do you want’? Either or, mostly used in a question. Actually, I can’t think of a place that ‘which’ isn’t used as a question, apart from with that oddly named shop.

Second: They’re, there and their.

  • There – ‘ooh, look, Sandra’s over there!’ A place where someone or something is.
  • Their – ‘it’s their cat’. Object or person belonging to a group of people.
  • They’re – ‘they’re a bit weird, aren’t they?’ Shortened form of ‘they are’. Can be used as two words, but ‘they’re’ is more commonly used nowadays.

Third: too, two and to.

  • Too – ‘too much’. Pretty self-explanatory, too much of something.
  • Two – two things (2).
  • To – eg sending a letter to someone. Basically, a use of the word ‘to’ that isn’t one of the above.

Forth: it’s or its.

  • It’s – short form of it is.
  • Its – possession. If you’re not sure if it needs an apostrophe or not, then try splitting it up into two different works. If it works, it needs an apostrophe. If it doesn’t, then obviously it doesn’t.

So yes, I hope that that’s helpful! Any others? 🙂

NaBloPoMo Index

Effect vs. Affect

When I googled this for some defined rules, it was the second top, just as I typed in ‘the difference between’. And it’s no wonder why, with these two dicky words causing English students more stress than if they were designing a meal for Gordon Ramsay.

So, what’s the difference?

Well, I’ll tell you the difference.

In general terms, ‘affect’ is used as a verb (‘to affect’ something) whilst ‘effect’ is used as a noun (‘an effect’ on something). 

“But what if I can’t tell?” I hear you ask. Well, there’s two ways  I can give to help you out:

  • Read it aloud and see which bit fits better.
  • Ask an English teacher.

Though if English teachers are in short supply, reading it aloud is good, too. Try it both ways – normally, that works well for me, though if that still doesn’t work…

Try adding another word in place of it.

Like, if you think it might be ‘affect’ but you’re not sure, add another verb in it’s place, and see if it works (obviously it won’t make much sense, but it’ll be enough to tell you if it’s right or not).

So yes, I hope that helped, as I know ‘effect’ and ‘affect’ are two biggies that need to be distinguished. Should I do others (eg which witch is which, they’re, their and there) or not?

🙂

NaBloPoMo Index