The Hardest Writing Task I’ve Ever Done

As I’m back at university now, I’m having a creative writing class every week and this week, I kid you not, I did the hardest writing task. Like, ever. I dare you to try it and let me know what you managed to do in the comments below!

We started out with a five minute free write. I love free writing (most recently, I wrote about it here) so this was a brilliant writing activity. We started off with the prompt:  Continue reading

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The Surprise of Poetry

e26397c7fe425a5a91b89fa5e4d92929Before I came to university, I didn’t write much poetry. I’d been writing more in the past year or so of A-Levels, but before then I had written maybe one or two poems. They were all terrible. As in, I don’t have them anymore, they were strings of words strung together in no real sense, terrible. Or sometimes they were flat prose in poem form (which is probably worse than just flat prose).  Continue reading

Can You Be Taught Creative Writing?

media_298873_enCurrently, I am at university studying English Literature… and Creative Writing. It’s not my first time ever taking a creative writing workshop/class, but for the first time I’m being taught by authors, researchers and all sorts about the craft of writing.

And yet, I’m posing this question – can you actually be taught how to do creative writing? There are, of course, two camps. Continue reading

Rules of Speech #2

Hey, folks. So, on November 15th, I did a post on the Rules of Speech (basically, grammar when writing dialogue). But, I realised I missed some stuff out, so here I am for mark 2!

For other info, please read the other article, linked above. I’ll be doing stuff today about separate sentences, and verbs splitting up speech.

Firstly, if you do a line of speech, and then the next line isn’t connected, it finishes in a full stop, and the next sentence starts with a capital letter. Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon, don’t worry.” Alice passed him a rubber duck.

Likewise, it works the other way. Example:

Alice passed him a rubber duck. “You’ll be one of us soon, don’t worry.” 

If the verb/s (eg ‘said’) describes the speech, it has commas. Read the article linked above for this info. 🙂

If a verb splits up a line of speech, but the whole bit of speech is one sentence, it’s all commas and lowercase letters. Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon,” she said, “don’t worry.”

If a verb splits up a line of speech, but they’re two separate sentences, it’s a comma, full stop and capital letter (in that order). Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon,” she said. “Don’t you worry.” 

If a word splits up a line of speech, but isn’t related to the way it’s spoken, it’s all full stops and capital letters. Example:

“You’ll be one of us soon.” She passed him a rubber duck. “Don’t you worry.”

So yeah, that’s basically it! Any other info? Feel free to ask! 🙂

And please, please, please read the other article for extra information about rules of speech. Look, I’ll even link it again!

– Hannah 🙂