Book Review | Bunny by Mona Awad

Trigger Warnings for this book: bestiality, murder, rape, assault, mental health, self harm.

Samantha is not the typical student you would on the famous Warren Creative Writing MFA, especially as a scholarship student. She is ostracised by the rest of her all-female cohort, a group of women who call one another “Bunny” and hug for too long. Then Samantha receives an invitation to their “smut salon”. As Samantha is dragged deeper into their sanctimonious world, the edges of fantasy and reality begin to blur, and the Bunnies push her to the edge.

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Book Review: Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

IMG_1916According to the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, written 1655 before she exploded, the world will end on Saturday. Actually… next Saturday. Just after tea. People have been predicting the end of the world almost from its very beginning, so it’s only natural to be sceptical when a new date turns up. However, it seems that the armies of Good and Evil are apparently amassing, and the four Bikers of the Apocalypse are hitting the road. However, there’s one angel and one demon who would quite like the Rapture not to happen. Oh, and they’ve also misplaced the Antichrist.

I read this book a while ago, so I apologise if this review isn’t particularly accurate, but this book was great and I loved it. It’s kind of hard to review a book that I enjoyed so much, because I can’t exactly pin down what I enjoyed so much about it. The witty humour? The awesome characters? The Britishness? ALL OF THE ABOVE?!

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Ways To Live Forever by Sally Nicholls

TITLE: Ways To Live Forever
AUTHOR: Sally Nicholls
PUBLISHER: Marion Lloyd Books (Scholastic)
YEAR OF PUBLICATION: 2008
NUMBER OF PAGES: 200
PRICE: £4.99
ISBN: 9781407107080
GOODREADS
PERSONAL SOURCE: Bought from a school fete
RATING: 4.5/5


Sam is eleven. He loves facts. He wants to know about airships and space and what it’s like to smoke a cigarette and go for a drink in the pub. He wants to know because he has leukaemia, and he’s dying. Sam especially needs the answers to the questions no one wants to hear.

I picked this up on a whim because I thought I’d heard of it before but then I put it on my shelf for a rainy day. Today wasn’t a rainy day, but I simply decided to read it and I only put it down to toast some crumpets. I read the entire thing in about two hours, and was fighting back tears from about the middle of it (okay, so I was feeling pretty tearful anyway but y’know).

This debut (!!) novel is made great by the protagonist: Sam, adorable, witty, curious Sam who wants to know answers and makes lists and is portrayed very realistically by not wanting to hang out with his aunts and uncles in the last few weeks he has to live.

The other supporting characters handle Sam’s sickness in various ways, and I think that this is very good, as it’s very realistic and provokes a variety of reactions from the audience. For example, his best friend Felix is very matter-of-fact about it, and as he is also dying this provokes empathy, whereas Sam’s dad walks away when the topic of conversation comes up.

The story ends how you expect it to: the protagonist dies (okay and this isn’t a spoiler because the first bit is, “By the time you read this, I’ll probably be dead.”). The ending is actually done very well and ties in with other bits of the story.

Yes, this story did make me cry and it did make me think. It’s amazing how Nicholls managed to make a book about an 11 year old dying humorous and optimistic too. I’d definitely recommend it. I’m not even entirely sure who it’s intended for, but I think any age could read it.