How to Cull Your Books

I have recently gone through a rather large book cull – that’s about 70 books, in case you were wondering! Therefore, I think I have a little bit of an idea about how to get rid of books. Even if I don’t, here are some of the tips I used to get rid of ones from my own shelf!

If you’ve read the book

Hopefully, if would be nice if all of your books you’re getting rid of have already been read and (hopefully, but of course not always) loved!

  • Is it sentimental? Of course, not everything has been kept, but if you’re not ready to part with a book just yet because of sentimental reasons, unless you have no room or have to get rid of it for other reasons, then keep it.
  • Do you think you are going to reread it? Obviously, in that case: it’s a keeper.
  • Did you enjoy it? If not, why on earth is it on your shelf? If you did, then think about how much you enjoyed it. For example, was it a 5 star read, or a 3.5 star read? Therefore… which one are you more likely to want to keep?
  • Do you think someone else would enjoy it more than you? 🙂
  • Is it worth keeping it on your shelf? You don’t have to keep every book. If in 10, 20 years down the line you decide that actually you would like to reread this book, then you can always get it anew or borrow it from your library. Unless there is value in that particular copy, you don’t have to keep it!

If you haven’t read the book

Now, I know that this one is a touchy subject. When my mum looked through books I was getting rid of, some of them haven’t been read by yours truly. What you have to remember, though, is that when you’re a teen – or, indeed, at any time in your life, but especially from ages 10 – 20 – you change so much that it is important to remember your reading tastes will change too. Whilst I might have bought a book even 2 or 4 or 6 months ago, I might have changed so much in that time that I won’t want to read that book anymore. It’s nothing to be ashamed of: appreciating this is a great way to appreciate yourself. Remember that you’ll be donating your books – or selling them – so someone else will also enjoy the novels.

  • How long has the book been on your shelf? 2 months? Perhaps it could be worth keeping. 6 months? You need to seriously think this through. A year? Two years? Hmm…
  • Are you ever going to read it? …Seriously?
  • Do you think that someone else will enjoy it more than you?
  • Are you scared of letting this book go because you “might” read it? How long have you been saying you “might” read this book?

Some things to always remember when you cull books:

  • You can always pick it up again! Bookstores and libraries exist!
  • Someone else might enjoy it more than you, and isn’t that incredible?!
  • And it just means more shelf space for a book you might absolutely love rather than a 3 star book instead. 🙂

So tell me: how often do you get rid of books? What’s your process?

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Pro-Review Writing Tips | III: Generic Hints and Tips

It’s the finale of my trio of posts! I’ve also written posts on writing the review and writing the book description if you would like to check that out!

Since I’ve been writing reviews for quite a while, I’ve amassed what, I think, are some pretty good tips that I like to use. Some I use every time I write; some on occasion; and some are very rare, and just in the back of my mind.  Continue reading

Pro-Review Writing Tips! | II: Book Description

Last week, I wrote about the writing process of book reviews. This week is writing a book description!

It’s worth saying that not everybody puts a book description in if they choose to write a book review. Some people like to incorporate it into their review part way through, and some, like me sometimes, copy and paste from Goodreads or Amazon.  Continue reading

Pro-Review Writing Tips! | I: The Writing Process

Slight disclaimer: I am by no means the world’s best reviewer. However, I have reviewed a lot of books in my time, and I thought I would share some of my tips of how to make your reviews rock. Or, at least, be mildly interesting.

This is one of three different blog posts in the mini series (they’ll be going up in the next few weeks). This one is (as you have seen) about the writing process of the actual review; then we get onto how to write a rocking book description; and finally just some final hints, tips, and pieces of advice to be a kind and considerate, as well as good, reviewer. Enjoy!  Continue reading

7 1/2 recommended books by female authors | IWD 2017

iwd-icon-logoHey everybody! Today (March 8th) is International Women’s Day around the world and I thought I would celebrate it on this blog by recommending some series and books I’ve LOVED by women authors.

International Women’s Day, firstly: why is it important? Well, because women aren’t being treated fairly in society. We earn less in the exact same job in which a man would be earning more. In America, and certainly other places in the world, we have to carry babies to full term because men seem to think they can control our uteri. We have to cover our shoulders and backs and thighs because allegedly they turn men on (in which case, men shouldn’t even be out in society) and yet we’re meant to sit back and watch happily as boys run around shirtless. Men get angry if we wear too much makeup; men get angry if we don’t. Men get angry if we won’t sleep with them; men get angry if we sleep with too many of them. Men try to control and explain our periods for goodness’ sake, and they get angry when we say, “Well, actually, you don’t have a period, but I do and it’s not like that…”*

Men, men, men. Women, women, women.  Continue reading

6 Ways Of Controlling Your TBR!

We all know that TBR*s are wild and dangerous things. They seem to miraculously grow whenever you turn your back even for the briefest of seconds, and the books just seem to mount up… and up.. and up.

*to be read [pile]

I am also the proud and slightly scared owner of a TBR pile, and I understand how nauseating and scary it can be to see the unread books looming over you and even causing reading slumps. *sigh* Unruly things, these.  Continue reading

Reading Out Of Your Comfort Zone 

51fh4ejd6kl-_sy344_bo1204203200_If there’s anything I’ve learnt at university, it’s that reading books you otherwise wouldn’t normally try can be really rewarding. A book I love, The Go-Between by LP Hartley, is a book that I would never have read if I hadn’t had to read it for university. Another book, Lolly Willowes by Sylvia Townsend, I wouldn’t have read for the same reason.

What I’m trying to say is: don’t be afraid to read books out of your comfort zone (even if you have to). They can be really rewarding. We read books to learn more, and become more empathetic, so surely reading books you don’t normally pick up is just helping you to become a “better” reader? (If these are the terms we take to mean a “good” reader, of course!)  Continue reading

How to Find the One… Notebook for You!

Pretty notebooks

Image from Google

Ha! Betcha thought I’d gone all weird and romance-y on my book blog. Don’t you worry about that: I’m still very much talking about writing.

Notebooks are my love. I have many unwritten in notebooks, notebooks with a few pages here and there, notebooks that have been filled and have had pages ripped out etc. etc. I am always travelling with a notebook, and I would just like to talk about how to find the notebook that will become your new writing companion.

Every writer needs a notebook. That is just a given. If you want to write, you have to have something to write in. Some people like to use their phones and the “notes” app, but that stresses me out nowadays, so I’m only going to be talking about the physical beauties and, yes, giving you some recommendations. Continue reading

Books to Netflix Adaptations (and some I want)

netflix-logoWell, that’s a thing I never thought I’d write. When people started to adapt books to films and even TV, I would imagine that no one thought “In the future, there’s going to be a solely subscription-based, internet program which is going to do awesome adaptations of really popular books”.

Huh. The things we don’t expect.   Continue reading

The Bookstagramming Culture

‘Bookstagram’ is a term used to describe the bookish side of Instagram. It is, I guess, a type of community, where people post pretty and artistic photos of books. Well, it is now, at any rate. I joined the community in 2015 and I feel that it has changed a lot.

My own photography skills have gotten better over the years, although even now I find that sometimes I’m not happy with the pictures I post. But here’s the conundrum: is it about the quality of the pictures, the artistry, time, and often money put into them, or is it about the books that are shown?  Continue reading