Write Everyday

write everydayLast year at a young writer’s conference, author Ian Shircore (Conspiracy!) was signing a copy of his book for me. Okay, so I was clearly an enthusiastic member at this conference, and he spoke to me about becoming a writer. The conversation went something (something as in I’m almost completely improvising) like this:

IAN: So you want to be a writer? 

ME: Yeah! 

IAN: Do you write everyday? 

ME: Well. Kinda. I mean, I don’t write fictionally everyday but I write a diary everyday if that counts.

(IAN looks up at me like I’m an idiot or something.)

IAN: Of course that counts! At least you’re writing! 

And that, folks, is what today is about: trying to persuade you to write everyday.

I confess: Wednesday was the first day I hadn’t written for the whole day in… months and months. Other times I hadn’t written in my diary, but I’d written an article, or fiction stuff. And, to be honest with you, it felt just plain weird.

Did you know, it takes you doing something for 21 days for it to become a habit? (Well, according to scientists. I’ll post the “scientifically decided” funniest joke in the world at the bottom of this article. See for yourself.) Anyway, the point of that was that you have to keep doing something to, well, keep doing it. Write everyday. Lots of words make a sentence, lots of sentences make a story and lots of stories make a writer.

Somethings to write if you don’t know what to write:

  1. A diary. You can record your feelings, thoughts, what you did, what you saw… even what you wrote, if you wrote anything!
  2. A journal. Kind of like a diary, but you might use prompts and make lists, or record ideas, facts, figures, draw in it etc.
  3. Plan. Kind of counts as writing, I guess? Plan your next best seller (okay even if you don’t write, the planning bit is fun), or your character’s children and/or family tree.
  4. Characterise. Write character sketches, a back story, or a conversation between characters.
  5. Write what you’re actually working on. Y’know, that could work too.

Even if you don’t feel like it (believe me, everyone has those days) get something down on paper. It might – probably – will actually make you feel better. And that’s good all ’round, huh?

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4 thoughts on “Write Everyday

  1. Pingback: Writing When You Don’t Feel Like Writing | Sprinkled With Words

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