Awesome Alliteration

So, shall we see how skillfully I can slip in some stupendous, superb (s)alliteration?

Or, let’s not.

But alliteration is a brilliant device to use in writing. But, what is it, first of all – well, according to Google, the definition is:

“The occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.”

So, basically, the first letter is the same of each word or words that are close to each other start with the same letter – such as my first sentence of this article.

Alliteration is useful to change tone to your story, especially as it makes it more vivid. Furthermore, it gives a more poetic style and ‘mimics the natural rhythm of the rain’. People read it more fluently, and it also makes a greater impact on the the reader’s memory – this means that they are more likely to remember your story if you have good alliteration! Also, alliteration gives dramatic effect – so, for example, if there is a huge action scene, or a scene where your character meets your true love, the alliteration makes the reader feel more for the story and the characters; exactly what you want.

However, you can’t over use alliteration. It gets too repetitive, and it makes the reader almost choke on the words. The readers are likely to stop reading, because they wouldn’t be able to get the words out in their head, either, so they won’t be able to do it if they’re reading aloud especially – exactly what you don’t want.

But you know something that’s perfect for alliteration?

Titles!

Titles are superb for alliteration. For example, one of the best known classics is Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice – which uses two ‘p’s – alliteration. Another one is John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men – two ‘m’s. It helps the reader remember them, and it can be shortened easily, without hopefully making it look bad – for example, Pride and Prejudice can become P&P (…although that can also stand for post and packaging…).

So yeah, I hope I reminded you about the awesomeness of alliteration. Challenge of the week: put some into your writing!

Any topics wanted for next time? Questions, tips? Shoot! 🙂

Sources:
Google
YAHOO! Answers
bbc.co.uk/bitesize

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